Low-grade metamorphism of mafic rocks. edited by Peter Schiffman and Howard W. Day
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Low-grade metamorphism of mafic rocks. edited by Peter Schiffman and Howard W. Day

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Published by Geological Society of America in Boulder .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Metamorphism (Geolog),
  • Rocks, Igneous

Book details:

Edition Notes

11

ContributionsSchiffman, P., Day, H.W.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE 475 A2L67 1995
The Physical Object
Pagination192 p.
Number of Pages192
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22034235M
ISBN 100813722969

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Scott G. Digel, T. M. Gordon, "Phase relations in metabasites and pressure-temperature conditions at the prehnite-pumpellyite to greenschist facies transition, Flin Flon, Manitoba Canada", Low-Grade Metamorphism of Mafic Rocks, Peter Schiffman, Howard W. Day. Low grade metamorphism of mafic rocks Low grade metamorphism of mafic rocks Schiffman, Peter Introduction Through most o f this past century, metamorphic petrologists in the United States have paid their greatest attention to high grade rocks, especially those which constitute the core zones of exhumed, mountain belts. About this book Low-Grade Metamorphism explores processes and transformations in rocks during the early stages of metamorphic recrystallization. There has been little analysis and documentation of this widespread phenomenon, especially of the substantial and exciting advances that have taken place in the subject over the last decade. Low-Grade Metamorphism explores processes and transformations in rocks during the early stages of metamorphic recrystallization.

Metamorphic mafic rocks (e.g. mafic schists and gneisses, amphibolites) are derived from mafic igneous rocks, mainly basalts and andesites, and of lesser importance, gabbros (Chap. 2). Metamorphic assemblages found in mafic rocks are used to define the intensity of metamorphism in the metamorphic facies concept (Chap. 4). Metamorphic mafic rocks (e.g., mafic schists and gneisses, amphibolites) are derived from mafic igneous rocks, mainly basalts and andesites, and of lesser importance, gabbros (Chap. 2). Metamorphic assemblages found in mafic rocks are used to define the intensity of metamorphism in the metamorphic facies concept (Chap. 4). The main and most widely spread metamorphic rocks from the group of low-grade schist metamorphism are argillaceous rocks namely slate, phyllites and schists as shown in Table Slate is an extremely dense, fine-grained metamorphic rock form under low-grade regional metamorphism emerged from pelitic sedimentary rocks such as shales and fine. Richard E. Bevins, Douglas Robinson, "Regional low-grade polygenetic metamorphism and inversion in the northern part of the Eastern Belt, Northern Sierra Nevada, California", Low-Grade Metamorphism of Mafic Rocks, Peter Schiffman, Howard W. Day.

The ultramafic rocks undergo continuous recrystallization due to large-scale convection in the sublithosphere mantle and as a result of tectonic processes in the lithosphere. The bulk of the mantle rocks, therefore, meet the criteria of metamorphic rocks. Metamorphic ultramafic rocks represent the largest volume of rocks of the planet.   Abstract. Metamorphic mafic rocks (e.g., mafic schist or greenschist and mafic gneiss, amphibolite) are derived from mafic igneous rocks, mainly basalts and andesites, and of lesser importance, gabbro and mafic diorite (Chap. 2). Cation distribution in the Z, Y, X, and W positions agree closely with the ideal stoichiometry (6, 4, 2, and 4, respectively), whereas the cation totals are for the EPMA mean and for the ICP analysis. The Archidona pumpellyite is strongly impoverished in rare earth elements (REE) as a whole and shows a smooth U-shaped REE pattern. Jeffrey R. Walker, Mary P. Murphy, "Chloritic minerals from prehnite-pumpellyite facies rocks of the Winterville Formation, Aroostook County, Maine", Low-Grade Metamorphism of Mafic Rocks, Peter Schiffman, Howard W. Day.