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An artisan missionary on the Zambesi being the life story of William Thomson Waddell largely drawn from his letters and journals by John MacConnachie

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Published by American Tract Society in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Missions

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby John MacConnachie ; with introduction by C.W. Mackintosh.
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 156 p., [9] leaves of plates :
Number of Pages156
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25397337M

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Artisan missionary on the Zambesi. New York: American Tract Society, [?] (OCoLC) Online version: MacConnachie, John, Artisan missionary on the Zambesi. New York: American Tract Society, [?] (OCoLC) Named Person: William Thomson Waddell; William Thomson Waddell: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion. Librivox Free Audiobook. Cribb on Cribb James Furness Podcast CMSTalk Podcasts How to Speak and Write Correctly by Joseph Devlin MIKE CURB COLLEGE OF ENTERTAINMENT AND MUSIC BUSINESS. An artisan missionary on the Zambesi: being the life story of William Thomson Waddell. Largely drawn from his letters and journals. Edinburgh: Oliphant. MLA Citation. MacConnachie, John. An artisan missionary on the Zambesi: being the life story of William Thomson Waddell. In his first book, Missionary Travels in South Africa, he described the falls, which he first saw on the Zambezi River in , and which he named “Victoria”. He wanted to continue his Zambezi explorations for not only religious and scientific reasons, and but also economic ones: the slave trade continued to flourish, and he was determined.

The success of the Victorian explorer and missionary David Livingstone's first book, Missionary Travels (), led to his receiving government funding in for an expedition up the Zambezi River. The trip was expected to last two years, and was intended to further commercial and scientific as well as missionary aims. London: T. Fisher Unwin, VERY SCARCE IN SUCH FINE CONDITION. An intimate and sympathetic dual biography of two French missionaries in South Africa. Distilled from copious journals and letters, the book describes the aims and difficulties of their mission with warm human interest. The book is filled with remarkable photographs throughout. David Livingstone - David Livingstone - The Zambezi expedition: This time Livingstone was away from Britain from Ma , to J He went out originally as British consul at Quelimane: This expedition was infinitely better organized than Livingstone’s previous solitary journeys. It had a paddle steamer, impressive stores, 10 Africans, and 6 Europeans (including his brother. He wrote and published Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa (), a detailed and ideologically loaded account of his experiences, which became an inspirational best-seller. He made speeches up and down the land promoting his idea of a cotton exporting Christian venture in central Africa, with the Zambezi as its ‘highway’.

  A godly family William Waddell was born in Scotland in the mid’s. His parents loved God, helped in the church, and taught young William about God and the Bible. William’s mother loved to read missionary stories and eagerly retold them to her children. Quiet and humble William had a sensitive nature and was very quiet. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. From Moffat’s mission at Kuruman on the Cape frontier, which Livingstone reached on J , he soon pushed his search for converts northward into untried country where the population was reputed to be more numerous. This suited his purpose of spreading the Gospel through “native agents.” By the summer of , he had already gone farther north than any other European into the.   Reading about Gladys. This past week I have been reading the books from my library about Gladys Aylward. I’m working on a series of missionary stories for kids, something I’ve wanted to do for a long time, but am realizing I won’t always be able to whip out a story a week as I had hoped. Though I am using only the books from my own personal library as source material, I have multiple.